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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

3 edition of Foreign know-how, firm control, and the income of developing countries found in the catalog.

Foreign know-how, firm control, and the income of developing countries

Ariel T. Burstein

Foreign know-how, firm control, and the income of developing countries

by Ariel T. Burstein

  • 314 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Intellectual capital -- Management,
  • Knowledge management,
  • Intellectual capital -- Developing countries

  • About the Edition

    Managerial know-how shapes the productivity of firms by defining the set of available technologies, production choices, and market opportunities. This know-how can be reallocated across countries as managers acquire control of factors of production abroad. In this paper, we construct a quantitative model of cross-country income differences to study the aggregate consequences of international mobility of managerial know-how. We use the model and aggregate data to infer the relative scarcity of this form of know-how for a sample of developing countries. We also conduct policy counterfactuals and find that on average, developing countries gain up to 23% in output and 9% in consumption when they eliminate all barriers to foreign control of domestic factors of production.

    Edition Notes

    StatementAriel Burstein, Alexander Monge-Naranjo.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 13073., Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 13073.
    ContributionsMonge-Naranjo, Alexander., National Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination41, [9] p. :
    Number of Pages41
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17633858M
    OCLC/WorldCa137302354

    Bank classifies a developing economy as low- or middle-income economies, and uses Gross National Income (GNI) per capita for the previous year. Developing countries generally do not have an established accounting and , which limits foreign investment and the growth of capital markets.   Providing low-cost tele­communications tech for the developing world, Huawei services and products are in countries. Number of Vodafone mobile customers: million.

    A MNC is a firm that owns and controls production facilities or other income-generating assets in at least two countries. When a foreign investor begins a green-field operation (i.e., constructs new production facilities) or acquires control of an existing local firm, that investment is regarded as a foreign direct investment (FDI) in the. Foreign direct investment (FDI) and trade are often seen as important catalysts for economic growth in the developing countries. FDI is an important vehicle of technology transfer from developed countries to developing countries. FDI also stimulates domestic investment and facilitates improvements in .

      Using a propensity score-matching approach, Görg and Kersting () compare the behaviour of foreign-owned firms in emerging and developing countries to the behaviour of a control group of locally owned firms. Donaubauer et al. (b) analyse the effect of improvements in financial markets on the gravity-driven distribution of FDI stocks. job creation from foreign direct investment. 30 Idea 13 Reducing the costs of moving goods within Africa would help countries gain more from international trade and tackle regional inequality. 32 Private sector performance 34 Idea 14 Better management practices in firms in developing countries can increase their productivity, profits, and size.


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Foreign know-how, firm control, and the income of developing countries by Ariel T. Burstein Download PDF EPUB FB2

Using aggregate data, we infer the relative scarcity of this form of know-how in a sample of developing countries. We find that developing countries gain, on average, 12% in output and 5% in welfare (with wide variation across countries) when they eliminate policy barriers to foreign control of domestic factors of by: Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries Ariel Burstein, Alexander Monge-Naranjo.

NBER Working Paper No. Issued in May NBER Program(s):Economic Fluctuations and Growth, International Finance and Macroeconomics, International Trade and Investment Managerial know-how shapes the productivity of firms by defining the set of available technologies. Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries * Article (PDF Available) in Quarterly Journal of Economics (1) Foreign know-how.

Get this from a library. Foreign know-how, firm control, and the income of developing countries. [Ariel T Burstein; Alexander Monge-Naranjo; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- Managerial know-how shapes the productivity of firms by defining the set of available technologies, production choices, and market opportunities.

This know-how can be reallocated across countries as. Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries ∗ Ariel Burstein UCLA and NBER Alexander Monge-Naranjo Northwestern University March Abstract Managerial know-how shapes the productivity of firms by defining the set of avail-able technologies, production choices, and market opportunities.

This know-how can. Using aggregate data, we infer the relative scarcity of this form of know-how in a sample of developing countries. We find that developing countries gain, on average, 12 % in output and 5 % in welfare (with wide variation across countries) when they eliminate policy barriers to foreign control of domestic factors of production.

Ariel T. Burstein & Alexander Monge-Naranjo, "Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries," The Quarterly Journal of And the income of developing countries book, Oxford University Press, vol. (1), pages FOREIGN KNOW-HOW, FIRM CONTROL, AND THE INCOME OF DEVELOPING COUNTRIES* Ariel T.

Burstein and Alexander Monge-Naranjo Management know-how shapes the productivity of firms and can be reallo-cated across countries as managers acquire control of factors of production abroad. Using aggregate data, we infer the relative scarcity of this form of know-how in a sample of developing countries.

We find that developing countries gain, on average, 12 % in output and 5 % in welfare (with wide variation across countries) when they eliminate policy barriers to foreign control of domestic factors of production.

reallocation of management know-how. Using aggregate data, we infer the relative scarcity of this form of know-how in a sample of developing countries. Wefind that developing countries gain, on average, 12% in output and 5% in welfare (with wide variation across countries) when they eliminate policy barriers to foreign control of.

Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries Article (PDF Available) January with 40 Reads How we measure 'reads'. FOREIGN KNOW-HOW, FIRM CONTROL, AND THE INCOME OF DEVELOPING COUNTRIES.

By Ariel T. Burstein and Alexander Monge-Naranjo. Abstract. Management know-how shapes the productivity of firms, and can be reallocated across countries as managers acquire control of factors of production abroad.

We construct a quantitative model to investigate the. Get this from a library. Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries.

[Ariel Burstein; Alexander Monge-Naranjo] -- Managerial know-how shapes the productivity of firms by defining the set of available technologies, production choices, and market opportunities.

This know-how can be reallocated across countries as. Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries. By Ariel Burstein and Alexander Monge-Naranjo. Download PDF ( KB) Abstract. Managerial know-how shapes the productivity of firms by defining the set of available technologies, production choices, and.

Firm types and jobs creation in developing. Patterns could be different in developing countries, where firms are smaller firms that support aggregate productivity International Integration Unit of Foreign know-how, firm control, and the income. VIENNA, Austria, Octo —Reducing risk in developing countries is key to spurring investment and growth.

A new report and investor survey published today by the World Bank Group concludes that, on balance, foreign direct investment (FDI) benefits developing countries, bringing in technical know-how, enhancing work force skills, increasing productivity, generating.

Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries”The Quarterly. By Ariel T. Burstein and Alexander Monge-naranjo. Abstract. Management know-how shapes the productivity of firms and can be reallocated across countries as managers acquire control of factors of production abroad.

We construct a quantitative model to. It gets more complicated. Today, most foreign investment is linked to something called "global value chains." This is the idea that most of the products that consumers buy -- say, cars -- are made up of parts and designs produced in different countries and shipped across borders to a final assembly site.

it may result in a firm's technological know-how being restricted to a limited knowledge base and stifles any future development. it does not give a firm the tight control over manufacturing, marketing, and strategy in a foreign country that may be required to maximize its profitability.

production in developing countries is not confined to the combined ownership and management which is traditionally called 'direct investment'.

There is a range of possibilities and combinations. Ownership can be shared, and the local share can be financial or active. A foreign firm can provide management, permanent or on contract, full or advisory.

OLS Regressions. Open Trade Regimes Positive Balasubramanyam et al. () 46 developing countries OLS regressions. Zhang () 11 developing countries in East Asia and Latin America, Granger causality tests. Income Level of Host Country Positive Blomstrom et al. () 78 developing countries OLS Regressions.International taxation is the study or determination of tax on a person or business subject to the tax laws of different countries, or the international aspects of an individual country's tax laws as the case may be.

Governments usually limit the scope of their income taxation in some manner territorially or provide for offsets to taxation relating to extraterritorial income.cating to other countries.

There exists a large literature on firm-level behaviour in developing countries which examine firm characteristics, including their economic performance, innovative per-formance, capabilities and business strategies.2 The third conceptual approach focuses on owner-operated enterprises.

Within this approach, the.